Cassanity

CASSANITY NOW!

View the Project on GitHub jnunemaker/cassanity

Cassanity

Layer of goodness on top of cassandra-cql so you do not have to write CQL strings all over the place.

Note about Cassandra 1.2

At this time, cassandra 1.2 is not supported. Under the hood, cassanity uses cassandra-cql, which does not currently support 1.2. It needs the thrift bindings (initial pull request) updated for 1.2 or to wrap the new binary protocol (initial pull request). I'm hoping to work on this in February or March, but if you want to take a stab, that would be awesome.

Installation

Add this line to your application's Gemfile:

gem 'cassanity'

And then execute:

$ bundle

Or install it yourself as:

$ gem install cassanity

Usage

require 'cassanity'

# client does the heavy lifting of setting up a cassandra cql database instance,
# a cassanity executor for that database, and a cassanity connection
client = Cassanity::Client.new

# get keyspace instance
keyspace = client[:my_app]

# tell client to use keyspace for future queries
# this is optional as cassanity always sends the keyspace and column family name
# whenever they are needed
keyspace.use

# schema for apps column family
apps_schema = Cassanity::Schema.new({
  primary_key: :id,
  columns: {
    id: :text,
    name: :text,
    created_at: :timestamp,
  },
  with: {
    comment: 'For storing apps',
  }
})

# get instance of column family with name and schema set
apps = keyspace.column_family({
  name: :apps,
  schema: apps_schema,
})

# you can also just pass a hash for the schema
apps = keyspace.column_family({
  name: :apps,
  schema: {
    primary_key: :id,
    columns: {
      id: :text,
      name: :text,
      created_at: :timestamp,
    },
    with: {
      comment: 'For storing apps',
    }
  },
})

# create column family based on name and schema
apps.create

# insert row
apps.insert(data: {
  id: '1',
  name: 'GitHub.com',
  created_at: Time.now,
})

# update name for row
apps.update(set: {name: 'GitHub'}, where: {id: '1'})

# delete row
apps.delete(where: {id: '1'})

# truncate column family (remove all rows, still can add new stuff)
apps.truncate

# drop column family (no more inserting into it, it is gone)
apps.drop

You can also do a lot more. Here are a few more examples:

More Reading

Compatibility

Contributing

  1. Fork it
  2. Create your feature branch (git checkout -b my-new-feature)
  3. Commit your changes (git commit -am 'Add some feature')
  4. Push to the branch (git push origin my-new-feature)
  5. Create new Pull Request